The Importance of Morning Rituals

Fall is always a get-back-into-the-routine kind of season. The more relaxed feel of summer fades as kids go back to school and work projects ramp up. For me, morning rituals are an important part of starting my day off on the right foot, and it’s something that I strongly encourage my clients to consider. Everything we do each day is a practice whether we’re conscious of it or not, so if the first thing I do is check email even before getting out of bed, that’s a practice. And unfortunately, research shows that that practice will likely negatively impact your whole day. At the same time, if I take the first moments of my day to engage in positive rituals such as reading an inspiring quotation, meditating, gentle stretching, and/or setting an intention for the day, I’m setting a foundation for a more positive day.

If you do an internet search you’ll find lots of suggestions on the best rituals to start your mornings. The intention is to create a routine that gives you energy, creates a positive mindset, and sets a successful tone for the day. I’ll offer a few that resonate with me.

Practice gratitude: There is a great deal of research on how gratitude increases well-being, relationships, optimism, physical and mental health and overall happiness, so practicing gratitude is a no-brainer. In my life, Jon and I wake up and cuddle for a few minutes then share something we’re grateful for. Another option suggested is to write in a gratitude journal.

Read something inspiring: Whether it is as short as reading a powerful quotation or a chapter of a book, daily learning and reflection is important. About a year ago, Jon and I started a practice of sharing a morning reading together (one of those books that has 365 days of wisdom) and we really enjoy it.

Be silent: Actively meditating, praying or breathing can be helpful in this fast-paced world. Most mornings, I light a candle, say my personal commitment to myself and then sit for 10-20 minutes. In the summer I do a walking meditation in my labyrinth outside.

Set an intention for the day: “What good shall I do this day?” is the question Benjamin Franklin asked himself each morning. I often ask clients to say their leadership commitment in the morning as a way to remind themselves of what they care about and what they want to pay attention to. You could also reflect on something you’re looking forward to or plan for possible challenges.

Make your bed: In the Power of Habit, author Charles Duhigg claims that making your bed is a “keystone habit” correlated with better productivity and a greater sense of well-being. It’s an initial positive action that starts a chain reaction for other good habits take hold. We use a duvet cover to make it quick and easy!

Exercise: Exercise improves blood circulation, builds energy and improves your cognitive skills. I typically do the 7-minute workout and my physical therapy exercises before breakfast. Some people (e.g., Barak Obama) swear by doing their exercise first thing in the morning as a way to make sure it happens.

Connect with loved ones: Research shows that people who have positive relationships live longer- a kiss or hug before leaving for work is good for us. For myself, in addition to the morning kiss goodbye to Jon, I also try to be in the kitchen for the fifteen minutes when the girls are eating breakfast as a way to be available and have a little conversation before they go back into their rooms to get ready for the day. (They’re no longer into the hug and kiss goodbye like they were when they were five.)

Cup of coffee or tea: One can’t deny the popularity of a morning beverage as a worldwide ritual. The familiarity, the comfort, the small joy it brings can be an important way to start the day. For me, after the kids are at school I enjoy my first cup of coffee while preparing for the day at my computer. Other people may use morning coffee as a time to connect with family, a quiet, reflective individual time, a pleasant treat while driving to work, or as a way to say hello to neighbors in the coffee shop.

Eat breakfast: The book, Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength, recounts a research study where a group of children were told to skip breakfast, and then at school, half the students received breakfast and half did not. Guess what happened? Those children who got breakfast learned more and misbehaved less, and then after all the children got a snack, the differences dissipated. Think you’re above that as an adult? Think again.

Worst thing first: We tend to have more self-control in the morning, so before getting on email, Facebook, etc. spend the first 20-30 minutes of your day doing your most important task that you’re likely to procrastinate on. I find that when I choose the task the evening before and write it down, the next morning when I get to my computer I jump right into it (sometimes I even open the document the night before) and it creates enormous positive momentum for the day. Mark Twain called this, “Eat your frog.”

Delay getting on email: What you don’t do can be as important as what you choose to do. Studies show that email is a stresser and negatively impacts productivity– so by staying off of it, you’re helping to manage your mood from the start.

Here are a few other things to consider: brush your teeth right when you get up, make your bed, drink a glass of water to rehydrate, get outside even for a few minutes, set your intentions before bed the night before, put your alarm clock across the room to avoid the “snooze” button, get dressed right away, end your shower with a blast of cold water (invigorating!), say a daily affirmation, journal (“morning pages” as described in “”The Artist’sWay” by Julia Cameron is an exercise many people love),

Clearly, there are a lot of choices on ways to start your day.  Join me in reflecting on what intentional morning rituals you want to try out.

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