Book Review: Leading and Managing in the Social Sector: Strategies for Advancing Human Dignity and Social Justice

Leading and Managing In The Social Sector

Editors: S. Aqeel Tirmizi and John D. Vogelsang

For the first time, I’m able to recommend a book that I participated in writing! While it’s hot off the shelves and I haven’t read all of it yet, (though I know that Chapter 12 on Women’s Leadership Development is very good), this book offers important developments in the field of leadership for the social sector in order to have more impact. The opening quotation of the book, by bell hooks (who doesn’t capitalize her name) expresses the intention of the book compellingly: “There must exist a paradigm, a practical model for social change that includes an understanding of ways to transform consciousness that are linked to efforts to transform structures.” The book covers Leading Social Innovation, Engaging Meaningfully in the Complex Social Context, Fostering Organizational Resilience, Leading in Social Sector Organizations, and Measuring Success. I highly recommend it! (Please email me if you’d like me to send you just a copy of my chapter on Women’s Leadership Development Through Networks of Support).

Moving From Theory To Action: The Importance of Celebrating Progress

ACT

To support you in practicing celebrating successes, here are some reflection questions:

 1. Looking back on my most recent accomplishments, are there any that I or my work team haven’t celebrated yet? Is it possible to do so now from the perspective of “Better late than never?”

2. To what extent do I have clear, measurable, meaningful goals at work? (Research shows that we need clear goals and they need to be personally meaningful to us).

3. If there are big goals, what are some milestones along that way that I can mark my progress? (The Power of Small Wins by Harvard Business Review, 2011,goes into this more)

4. How might I celebrate these successes and milestones? With whom?

5. What can I do today to set a celebration in motion? (Identify a few possible ways to celebrate? Send an email to someone to have a conversation about this? Set some possible dates?)

The Importance of Celebrating Progress

Marla and Kerry

Marla and Kerry

This month I’ve succeeded in an important goal and I want to invite you to celebrate with me. With my colleague, Marla Solomon, Director of Partnership Programs for Five Colleges, I am co-author of a chapter for the book, Managing in the Social Sector: Strategies for Advancing Human Dignity and Social Justice. The chapter shares the scholarship and research behind the Women’s Leadership Circle of Vermont model and the positive impact it is having on the women leaders who have participated. We have been researching the efficacy of the circles and analyzing since 2011 what makes them work so well. I also presented our findings at the Global Conference of the International Leadership Association this past fall, and it was a huge honor to contribute to the field of leadership on an international level. Marlboro College Center for New Leadership, my organizational partner in offering the WLC program around the state, hosted a book launch party for me in January, and I noticed how re-energized I am. It has me curious about the importance of celebration of milestones in one’s life.

I notice that as a person who works for herself, there aren’t any big company celebrations or regular work colleagues I see daily with whom I can share success. This book launch party was a reminder of how important it is to have people witness and celebrate achievements. For me, it was a chance to pause and reflect on how far I’ve come with the Women’s Leadership Circles program since the first circle in 2011. It helped change my mindset. I’ve never thought of myself as a researcher-type, yet here is my work in a graduate- level academic book. It has helped me to change how I see myself, and I now have a new touchstone for accomplishing something that I thought might not be possible for me. It felt good! My husband and daughters gave me flowers at the event, and it was great to have them recognize this achievement. (For all you armchair neuroscientists-that was the dopamine release). It fueled my energy. I feel recommitted to the importance and impact that the Women’s Leadership Circles are having on the state of Vermont, and I can feel myself wanting to double down and move to the next phase of work. I was also told it inspired them. Several people came up to me sharing how it got them energized and excited about going back to their circles. Celebrating success can reconnect us to purpose and meaning.

In my work as an executive coach, I frequently support clients in goal-setting. I always ask people, what they will do when they accomplish their goal? What are the milestones they want to mark along the way and how will they celebrate? I often receive the comment that “accomplishing the goal is reward enough.” But the research says differently. It really does matter for a number of reasons.

  1. It helps us self-reflect on where we have come from and where we are heading.
  2. It helps create a success mindset.
  3. It feels good.
  4. It energizes and builds motivation for future endeavors.
  5. It creates a positive environment that inspires others.

Taking the time to celebrate has been critically important to completing this cycle of work, from the inception of the idea to having the book chapter published. Off to have a glass of champagne now!

Book Review: Aung San Suu Kyi’s “Freedom from Fear” Speech (1990)

Aung San Suu Kyi

Having just returned from the B Corp* Champions Retreat in Philadelphia, I’m going to deviate from my typical book review format and instead offer a speech that was discussed at the Retreat. Each year the conference organizers select a speech designed to invite us to pause, deeply reflect and be inspired by courageous leaders in the world, and then discuss it in small groups. This year’s selection was

Aung San Suu Kyi’s “Freedom from Fear” Speech (1990)

Aung San Suu Kyi led the National League for Democracy (NLD) to a majority win in Myanmar’s first open elections in 25 years in 2015. The win came five years to the day since she was released from 15 years of house arrest. In 1991 she was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for or her non-violent struggle for democracy and human rights.. Suu Kyi asks us to look at at least one of the root causes of exclusion – fear, and invites us to consider what is required of each of us to rise about our most base emotions to live into our highest aspirations. The text is a short three pages and offers a different cultural lens with which to look at the human condition. I believe her message, written over 25 years ago from another context, is very relevant to understanding our current US political arena.

*My business, Watershed Coaching, LLC is a certified B Corp– a Benefit corporation committed to business being a force for good.

Moving From Theory to Action: Curious vs. Convinced

ACT

To support you in deepening your curiosity with those who hold different views from you, I offer some questions reprinted with permission by my friend and colleague, Howard Ross. These come from his company’s resource guide: Inclusive Responses in Times of Fear. See this and other resources on cookross.com.

 1. How do you feel about people who think differently than you about this?

2. What are you afraid of? What is more inspiring to you than fear?

3. How can you engage in these conversations authentically and whole-heartedly? What might get in the way?

4. What are you committed to? How do you see your role/contribution in any conversations or actions?

5. What is your desired outcome for these conversations?

water-shed (watr'shed') Noun: a critical point that marks a division or change of course; a turning point — © 2014 WatershedCoaching. All rights reserved.